3 Easy Ways You Can Learn Phrasal Verbs and Expressions More Efficiently



In this short episode, I wanted to briefly discuss how you can learn phrasal verbs and expressions more efficiently and effectively using some examples from my conversation with Vanessa Paisley.


In this episode, I discuss some phrasal verbs and expressions and you'll then be able to hear them in the context in the next episode: Episode 5. I wanted to take this opportunity to explain in more detail how you can learn expressions and phrasal verbs in context.


I discuss:


✨ How to learn expressions and phrasal verbs

✨ How to be brave and clarify if you're not sure

✨ Some example expressions

✨ How sometimes it's not what you say but how you say it

✨ What Neuroscience tells us about attention and how you can use this to focus your learning so it's more efficient and effective.


Books and Resources:

💻 Livewired, David Eagleman


💻 Blog Post : How to Dramatically Improve Your Speaking to Give an Engaging Presentation


Recommended episodes:


Episode 5: How to Thrive as a Cross Culture Communicator: Overcoming Culture Shock and Communicating More Effectively Across Cultures with Vanessa Paisley https://www.archienglish.com/post/how-to-develop-your-intercultural-awareness-to-communicate-more-effectively-across-cultures

Episode 1: How to Build Your English Confidence: for Architects and Built Design Professionals

https://www.archienglish.com/post/how-to-build-your-english-confidence-for-architects-and-built-design-professionals

✨ Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archienglishteacher

✨ Connect with me on LinkedIn Tara Cull


✨ Extended Show Notes and Full Transcript: https://www.archienglish.com/post/3-easy-ways-you-can-learn-phrasal-verbs-and-expressions-more-efficiently

Want to Learn More Expressions and Vocabulary in Context?

If you feel like you want to understand more about the expressions and language you hear your colleagues using at work or your professors using at university or the people around you using, then you sign up for the vocabulary email. I send an email each fortnight with examples of phrasal verbs I've heard or used in my real conversations or emails with architects, clients and others in the industry. Take me to the Signup



Table of Contents Books and Resources

Vocabulary

Transcript Images of Expressions


Vocabulary


pick up - obtain, acquire or learn something

E.g. Try to pick up the local language when you move there.

E.g. How was the webinar? Yeah, I picked up a few good tips and ideas. bite the bullet - to force yourself to perform an unpleasant or difficult action

E.g. Sometimes you just have to bit the bullet and step outside your comfort zone

take a step back - consider something from a broader or more objective perspective

E.g. After a few long weeks of work, I try to take a step back and reflect on everything I've achieved get on with things - to start or continue to do something

E.g. I need to stop focusing on the negative and just get on with things


make a leap / take a leap - to go for something and take a chance on something

E.g. I took a leap and applied for the job and I was pleasantly surprised to get a callback

to unpack something - to analyse something and all the components

E.g I wanted to unpack why I was feeling disappointed


on the same page - to agree

E.g. I think we are on the same page with that idea.


on my radar - to be more aware of something

E.g. I've been researching this material so it's on my radar


knocked up - to put something together

E.g. I knocked up a plan for the client yesterday

tone it down - make something less extreme or intense.

E.g. We need to tone down the jargon we use in the industry


flag something - to bring someone's attention to something E.g. I wanted to flag a problem we have with the 3D model



Transcript


Transcript

Quick Find Snippets - Take me straight to these sections Three ways to learn expressions

What do you do if you don't know the meaning of an expression?

Expressions - to do with being an ex-pat and settling into a new culture

Stress and Emphasis in English What does Neuroscience tell us about attention, memory retention and learning?


Transcript


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 00:09

Hello Big thinkers and welcome to think big English for architects. I'm your host, Tara Cull, Neurolanguage coach, English teacher and landscape architect. And I'm bringing together all these passions to help people within the built design profession, who speak English as a second language to build outstanding communication skills. You can learn more about my coaching programmes at archienglish.com. Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 00:35

Today, in a shorter episode, I wanted to explain how you can learn expressions and phrasal verbs in context. So in the next episode, in Episode Five, you'll hear from me and Vanessa Paisley, we had a conversation about intercultural communication. And in this episode, we talked about how sometimes it's more important that you ask people to explain what expressions mean. And we talked about how sometimes it's about simplifying language. And so it really made me think that maybe what I could do is make a separate episode with some of the expressions that we talk about within the conversation. Often, when we're learning a language, we can learn expressions as either long lists or we listen, or we try to figure out them separately. And while this might be effective in the long term, I wonder if it really helps with the long term recall of expressions. Now personally, I find it much easier to learn expressions in French when I attach them to a real situation, or a real conversation, or something that I feel emotionally connected to, and many others that I speak to feel this way as well. It's about using the language that we really need and knowing what's going to be relevant for the situations that we need them for.

Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 02:04

So today, I wanted to share three ways that you could learn expressions more effectively, by using content that will be relevant, but also useful for your job or your everyday life. Then I'm going to share the examples that Vanessa and I talked about within the podcast episode in episode number five. So in the next episode, I'm also going to discuss why it's important to as a learner or a second language, speaker of English, why it's important to put yourself out there. And to clarify, when you don't understand what somebody is saying when you don't understand the expressions that they're using. Finally, in the next episode, Vanessa Paisley, she made this great quote, and I wanted to talk about it today. She said that sometimes it's the way that you say things that is more important than what to say. So I'm going to briefly discuss how she used stress and emphasis in this particular sentence, and how we use it in English as a way to get you to focus your attention on listening out for this in the next episode. And I'm going to touch on the neuroscience a little bit behind why attention matters. But don't worry, it's not too complicated or too complex. So let's get into today's episode.


Three ways to learn expressions


1. Videos, Podcasts or reading relevant material


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 03:29

What are three ways that you can learn expressions, the first way for me is to learn using videos, podcasts, or relevant reading material. One of the best ways to learn anything is to do it in context. So to attach it to, or associated with something that is relevant to, if it's relevant to you or your job, then you're more likely to hear the types of expressions that you will use for that situation. Very often what I hear people doing when they're learning a language is they may be watching TV shows or trying to watch things that don't necessarily have much to do with what they really need English for, or what will make the most impact. And often what will make the most impact is where you feel the least confident, and often for people that is at work. So for example, if you're listening to an architect, explain cross ventilation, or a particular material, or why it's more effective or anything to do with what you need to do in your job, then you're going to hear the relevant expressions that you're more likely to use on a daily basis. Now one really good example The other day, I was talking to an architect who was telling me about how the day before he had knocked up a plan to send to the client in only like a very short amount of time. And so that's just one example of how you're going to hear them using more laid back or colloquial language sometimes when you're listening to an architect speak. So my suggestion is to think about the ways that you can take note of some of these ones that you hear, and try to use maybe one or two of them within a few days of hearing it. Don't try and learn everything at once, of course, you're not going to be able to learn everything at once. It's about staying curious, and making it a process. I know that there's sometimes an urgency attached to being more confident, but it takes time, so stay curious and open to the process. So often, what I suggest my clients do is things like watch videos on YouTube. So often I use videos from 30x40 Studio design studio on YouTube ArchiMarathon on YouTube. And there's a number of different podcasts you can be listening to as well. A number of different videos on YouTube TED Talks, as well. There's so much content out there that you could be listening to about topics that are interesting and relevant to what you do.

2. Learn them by situation or topic


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 06:30

The next tip would be to Learn phrasal verbs and expressions. So if you're interested in advancing your English, of course, expressions and phrasal verbs are a big part of what we do and what we use on a daily basis. And that's just thinking about the conversation that I had with Vanessa. You know, even though we're two people who are very conscious of how we use language, we still were using expressions. So learn the expressions and the phrasal verbs by the situation or the topic. Often we learn a particular word so particular phrasal verbs, grouped as a word. So for example, the word bring, so you might learn all the phrasal verbs with the word bring. And sometimes I group phrasal verbs like this as well. But I think it's also important to mix it up and learn expressions and phrasal verbs for a particular situation, because you're more likely to attach it to meaning and associated to the situation that you need it for, and the one that holds a meaning for you. So for example, you might use phrasal verbs for starting a meeting. So kick off, for example, or conducting a meeting moving on, or expressions for how do you express disappointment. So picking a situation or a topic is a good way to learn expressions. So say, for example, you want to learn the expressions for one thing, you might type it into Google and come up with 100 100 different examples of phrasal verbs or expressions.


3. Write a story using some examples


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 08:16

My third example would be to write a story using some of the examples that you learn. So after you learn a few expressions, try and use them in a story that's going to be relevant to you. And you can do this by writing or saying out loud, it doesn't have to be anything too formal, it could just be a little story about what you did for the day using these expressions. So for example, one of the phrasal verbs and I'm going to talk about in a moment is picked up. So when you pick up something means to learn something new. So you might say, Ah, I, today when I was working in Revit, I picked up a few errors in the drawing, for example, or I picked up a few new tips and tools that I can use for the next time. So it doesn't have to be a formal situation, it can just take a couple of minutes to do that. So there are my top three tips. Firstly, is to use relevant content. Learn them by situation or topic rather than lists of words that are not necessarily related. And then use story to attach it to an example. What do you do if you don't know the meaning of an expression?


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 09:33

Next, I want to talk about what do you do if you don't know the meaning of an expression? Say for example, you're in a meeting, or you're talking to your boss? What can you do if you don't know the meaning? Now, I think it's important to not be afraid to ask now obviously, there will be a time and a place you can't necessarily stop a meeting in the middle. When the client sitting there and say, Hey, I don't know what what you're talking about here. You could just take a note, maybe write it down for later to ask a question. And I think what you can do to in something that I've thought about a lot more recently is that you could do it in a more engaging way than just saying, sorry, I don't understand. Or what does that mean? I'm not sure. You could do it by saying, hey, that's a new expression. I haven't heard that before. Or what does that mean? That's a new one for me. Or that's a new one for me, does it mean, and try and guess what it means, for example, I think it's really important for the people around you to be aware that you don't necessarily understand what they're saying. And I think that the more you do this, and the more that you call out the people who are using these expressions, it helps them to gain more insight into what it feels like when people use exclusive language. And it helps those around you to build that awareness about the language that they use to help you feel more included in the conversation. Because often, they don't really realise that they are doing it until they're made aware of it. And I noticed that the more people are made aware of this, the more likely they are to pick up these things. I even sometimes get people sending me messages on Instagram, who are native speakers, telling me, Hey, I heard this expression, this would be a good expression that you could share with your clients. So even with Vanessa, as I was saying, even though we are more aware of the language that we use because we are working with non-native English speakers, we still do it. And we still use them, because it just naturally comes out. Expressions - to do with being an ex-pat and settling into a new culture


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 11:48

So speaking of that conversation, I'm going to share with you some of the expressions. And these expressions, obviously, because in the next conversation, we're going to talk about being an expat and settling into a new culture. So these expressions have a lot to do with that subject or that topic. And so that's what I'm saying about learning expressions and phrasal verbs within a topic or a situation that you might need to use them for.


pick up - obtain, acquire or learn something

E.g. Try to pick up the local language when you move there.

E.g. How was the webinar? Yeah, I picked up a few good tips and ideas. bite the bullet - to force yourself to perform an unpleasant or difficult action

E.g. Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and step outside your comfort zone

take a step back - consider something from a broader or more objective perspective

E.g. After a few long weeks of work, I try to take a step back and reflect on everything I've achieved get on with things - to start or continue to do something

E.g. I need to stop focusing on the negative and just get on with things


make a leap / take a leap - to go for something and take a chance on something

E.g. I took a leap and applied for the job and I was pleasantly surprised to get a callback

to unpack something - to analyse something and all the components

E.g I wanted to unpack why I was feeling disappointed


on the same page - to agree

E.g. I think we are on the same page with that idea.


on my radar - to be more aware of something

E.g. I've been researching this material so it's on my radar


knocked up - to put something together

E.g. I knocked up a plan for the client yesterday

tone it down - make something less extreme or intense.

E.g. We need to tone down the jargon we use in the industry


flag something - to bring someone's attention to something E.g. I wanted to flag a problem we have with the 3D model

Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 15:39

So we've spoken about a few expressions that we use in the episode when my in my conversation with Vanessa in Episode Five and now I want to briefly talk about stress and emphasis in English using one example.


Now, when you listen to the episode, you'll hear Vanessa say something that I think really perfectly demonstrates exactly what she's trying to say. And she says,


I find CULTURE comes into it doesn't it because it's the WAY you say things that is sometimes more important than WHAT you say - Vanessa Paisley

So while in the episode, she's talking about politeness, and how you can be more diplomatic, something that I really noticed and I wanted to share with you is how she uses stress to demonstrate the content, and how what she's saying is important. And she demonstrates this perfectly without even realising. stress and emphasis are something that I've noticed is it can be difficult for learners of language, especially when you're in the advanced stages, because it's difficult for some people to hear it. So English is a stress timed language, whereas many other languages like Mandarin, or Brazilian Portuguese, or Italian, or French and some argue to a varying degree, are syllable timed languages, so the rhythm is more consistent, whereas English tends to have a pattern of stressed and unstressed. English tends to have a pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in regular intervals. And then for example, some words are emphasised and stressed as well within the sentence as well. So in the example that I gave, Vanessa uses emphasis to emphasise the important words in the sentence. And then when we want to emphasise certain words, we say it louder, and we stretch it out longer. And now that you're hearing me do this as well, you're probably going to notice it more often when I'm speaking. So which words are they with? How do we know which words to place emphasis on? Well, we call the words that we want to emphasise the content words or the words that hold the important meaning in the sentence. And they are the nouns, the action verbs, the additives, the adverbs, the question words, and often negatives as well.


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 18:14

Now, I've written a more detailed blog post about this and how it applies to giving more engaging presentations. And this is titled, how to dramatically improve your speaking to give an engaging presentation. And so I talk about stress. And I talk, I talk about a number of different things in terms of how to give a more engaging presentation. But it talks about the importance of stress, when we're speaking, and the rhythm of English and how different it can be to other languages.



What does Neuroscience tell us about attention, memory retention and learning?


Tara Cull - ArchiEnglish 18:46

Now, why am I telling you this? Well, neuroscience, it tells us more about attention, memory, and learning. And I wanted to point this out to you, because what neuroscience tells us is, if we help the rain to know what information to pay attention to, and what to associate it to, then we're more likely to retain the useful information. And you're more likely to now that you're listening to me speak, try and look for the stress and the different patterns within the speech. Now, this is especially important if the information we are learning will be useful for our immediate future. So say, for example, you're giving a presentation and you want it to be more engaging, then you're possibly going to be listening out for how somebody uses stress and emphasis, and you're probably more likely to hear it also. And the other thing is all this...all these things that I'm talking about, by pointing out the vocabulary that you're going to hear in the next episode, and also telling you what to look out for in videos and podcasts. It's really likely to help you to look out for these things and to pay attention to it. And it's what you do with the information afterwards, that will help to commit it to your long term memory. So it's important that you use what you learn. So when you notice it, and you start to pay more attention, you're starting to commit it more to your long term memory.


We have discussed:


So what have we discussed today, we've talked about how to learn expressions and phrasal verbs, and why it's important to learn in context. We've talked about how you can ask for clarification, and also why it's important to create a culture of curiosity, especially around those that you work with to help them help you. We've talked about the expressions that you'll hear in the next episode, and what they mean. And then the importance of what you say and how you say it. And why it's important to know that it's what you listen out for, it's what you need to pay attention to. Because this really encourages you to be more efficient and effective with the strategies that you use to build your confidence. So I'm definitely all about being efficient and effective. And using the right strategies to get you where you need to be rather than spending so much wasted time stressing about certain things. We want to help you to feel more confident quicker. So I hope you enjoyed today's shorter episode. I now invite you to go and listen to my conversation with Vanessa Paisley. In Episode Five. I am sure that you will absolutely love this conversation. She talks about some great things in terms of culture shock, we talk about adapting to different cultures and how to become more aware of intercultural communication are in my next conversation with you very soon.





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